Friday, October 15, 2010

To fuel the fire of evangelism....

I have been reading two books. One, 23 Minutes in Hell, by Bill Wiese, about a man who had a bizarre experience one night where at 3:00 AM in the morning, he woke up and suddenly found himself making a descent into Hell. He returned to reality at 3:23. He tells of the experience in this book, and explains that God allowed him to have this experience so that he would tell people that Hell is real, and how to escape it.

He says that he is the most normal of men, not ever having had any kind of mental health issues, and being very organized, etc. He said this is why he believes God chose him for this experience, so that people would know it was God and not some mental health problem.

The description of Hell is terrifying, and it does fuel the fire of evangelism, as it made me so upset at first. The evening I read the main bulk of the book, I couldn't sleep. It is deeply disturbing that anyone would go to such a place of torment, and you want to warn people that Hell is no joke!

This brings the fear of God on me, causing me to think of His judgment, and wanting to be pleasing to Him in this life, so that I will have no regrets in the next life.

The next book is Just Walk Across The Room by Bill Hybels. This book is completely different from the last one, centering on God's goodness and grace. Hybels mainly helps you to write down your story of coming to faith, and to condense it to only a few words. He says that you must reduce it to 100 words or less, but I came up with 172 words. I figure that is not important as long as it is still short.

He points out some of the typical mistakes that people make when telling their "God" story, and shows you how to avoid these. I realized that I was making one of the big ones at first when I wrote my story. I was telling my "weird God story" right away when telling my story - the thing that you don't want to tell up front to someone you hardly know that they might not understand, or that might be too much for them right away. I was telling them that. I realized that this was just on the periphery of the real story.

He helps you get to the meat of your story and tell that.

He also just tells lots of stories of encounters with people that resulted in them coming to faith.

It is an interesting and engaging book that fuels the flame of evangelism.

Here is my story that I came up with after following Hybels' instructions:

I grew up in a Lutheran pastor’s home, and though I knew God as a child, as a teen I ended up hating God!

God turned my life around at 18. Because of some devastating problems, I turned back to God.

Then He showed me Hell was real, and I would have been going there, but Jesus had saved me from it!

So, I stopped hating God and knew He loved me enough to save me from Hell, but still doubted He loved me like a true friend because of the difficult things I had gone through, and because I couldn’t find love in the church. I was unhappy with Christians.

I looked for love in “all the wrong places,” but eventually found an ‘alive’ church.

I found out what the church is like when it is alive! The Christians there helped me and I found out God loves me more than I can possibly imagine! What would I do without Jesus who gives me hope in every area of my life?


We're supposed to then memorize the story and tell it whenever we "walk across the room" to make an attempt at sharing our faith.

Thursday, October 7, 2010

My Story

I grew up in a Lutheran pastor’s home, and though I knew God as a child, as a teen I ended up hating God!


God turned my life around at 18. Because of some devastating problems, I turned back to God.

Then He showed me Hell was real, and I would have been going there, but Jesus had saved me from it!


So, I stopped hating God and knew He loved me enough to save me from Hell, but still doubted He loved me like a true friend because of the difficult things I had gone through, and because I couldn’t find love in the church. I was unhappy with Christians.


I looked for love in “all the wrong places,” but eventually found an ‘alive’ church.


I found out what the church is like when it is alive! The Christians there helped me and I found out God loves me more than I can possibly imagine!


What would I do without Jesus who gives me hope in every area of my life?


Sunday, October 3, 2010

Rock and Roll

This was sent to me by my friend who is in a Catholic community on the East coast of the United States.

The timing is incredible because I was just thinking, as I heard some music with a heavy beat with it's origins in the 60s, that we are surrounded now by music that has that African-based drum beat. Every where we go, even in church, there is that beat. When do we have quiet music, like streams of rivers, music that just calms the soul? That occurred to me, and then my friend sent me this. Now, let me say that I do not want to be holier-than thou. I do not want to discount all of the music being done today by Christians that is contemporary and has a rock sound. There is revival going on, and much of the music has a rock sound, as young people are at the heart of it.


I don't want to miss out on revival by getting all hoity toity about rock rhythms. But I think there is a valid point to be made about how rock music has permeated our culture, and that we need to ask what effect this has had on us, or is having, especially, we need to be concerned about young people and their choices, as always.


With that said, read this.....


O son of man, I have made thee a watchman to the house of Israel: 8 When I say to the wicked: O wicked man, thou shalt surely die: if thou dost not speak to warn the wicked man from his way: that wicked man shall die in his iniquity, but I will require his blood at thy hand. 9 But if thou tell the wicked man, that he may be converted from his ways, and he be not converted from his way he shall die in his iniquity: but thou hast delivered thy soul.

A watchman is a man who is appointed to protect buildings or property. Formerly, he patrolled the streets at night to guard their belongings. You are God’s baptized property and a priest is your guardian, your watchman. And I have message for you that isn’t very popular. It is a message about a medium which is dominated by the enemies of Christ. It is a message about music and the angels who inspire this music. Yes, good angels inspire good music. But bad or fallen angels inspire bad music. This sermon is mostly meant to protect your children because hopefully most adults, if they listen to music, know the difference between good and bad music. But just in case, let the listener watch out.

… as time went on, the poets themselves introduced the reign of vulgar and lawless innovation. They were men of genius, but they had no perception of what is just and lawful in music; … ignorantly affirming that music has no truth, and, whether good or bad, can only be judged of rightly by the pleasure of the hearer. And by composing such licentious works, and adding to them words as licentious, they have inspired the multitude with lawlessness and boldness, and made them fancy that they can judge for themselves about melody and song.[1]

Though this could have been written today, this passage was written some 2350 years ago by the philosopher Plato, who claimed that bad music had corrupted the democracy of Athens. Plato argued the problems had started when good manners were broken by educated people during music concerts. That’s right; Plato said music concerts were to blame.[2][3] Sound familiar? Plato also said that, “Music is a moral law.” Meaning, according to Plato the music we listen to influences what moral guidelines we follow. If we listen to good music, we will be inclined toward the good. If it is bad music that we listen to, we will be inclined toward evil.

Now Thomas Carlyle wrote that, "Music is well said to be the speech of angels. [4] Let us look more deeply to see how true the connection is between music and the angels – in particular the fallen angels.

Great Balls of Fire - Jerry Lee Lewis, will be remembered with Chuck Berry, Little Richard, and Elvis Presley, as one of the true fathers of Rock & Roll. I have the devil in me! If I didn't have, I'd be Christian!" said Jerry Lee Lewis at a 1957 recording session. "I was directed and commanded by another power: the power of darkness," Little Richard said, “the power that a lot of people don't believe exists. The power of the Devil. Satan. ."[5]

Elvis was a great fan of occultist Madame Blavatsky. Elvis constructed is own “personalized religion out of what he'd read of Hinduism, Judaism, numerology, theosophy, mind control, positive thinking and Christianity"[6]

These three great fathers of Rock and Roll were all into the occult. In 1951 when this new kind of music came onto the scene, it was called by different names: boogie-woogie, rhythm and blues, etc. However, none of these terms seemed to “Hit the spot” until a DJ. named Allan Freed, who worked on a Cleveland Ohio radio station, went down into the ghetto area of Cleveland and asked them what they called this kind of music. “Rock and Roll” they replied, “Due to the fact that we commit fornication and/or adultery to the beat of the music; many times in the back seat of a car, so we rock and roll.” Allan Freed returned to the radio station using the term and the rest is history.

JIMI HENDRIX, was still considered in 1992 by Rolling Stone Magazine to be the “greatest guitarist of all time.” “Jimmy was into mysticism, said a friend of his. “He admitted he was possessed by an evil spirit, and he wrestled with it constantly.” When Hendrix sacrificed his guitar on the stage, burning it and smashing it, he wasn’t joking around. Rather, when he sang, “I am a voodoo child,” he meant what he said.

Jim Morison of the Doors, admitted he was possessed by spirits. In his journals, he identified the spirit that was, the spirit of his music. Satan was his “secret mind,” he wrote. Band member Ray Manzarek commented on his deceased band leader by saying, “Jim was real, he was not a showman, he was shaman, and he was possessed...”

In 1988 Rolling Stone reported of Brian Wilson of the Beach Boys, that he is continually plagued with spirits and voices…though he had seen 39 different therapists and had been bed-ridden for a long time. He was a tortured rock and roll legend that many today, still sing to. “We were doing witchcraft, trying to make witchcraft music,” Brian admitted in a Rolling Stone interview. [7]

In the book, the “Rolling Stones in their own words.” Keith Richards was asked, “Do you think of yourselves as servants of Satan? Keith said he was a follower of Alexis Crowley. “Once you start there is no turning back,” Keith said. “Everyone’s Lucifer”

Who was this Aleister Crowley that the Rolling Stones followed? He was an early 20th century British bi-sexual occultist who came to see himself as the prophet entrusted to inform humanity, that it was entering the new Aeon of Horus. In other words, he ushered in the New Age. Who was this New Age going to be dedicated to? Horus is the Egyptian deity we call the devil. “I was not content to believe in a personal devil and serve him,” wrote Crowley, “I wanted to get hold of him personally and become his chief of staff.”[8] Crowley taught that one could be a musical genius through contact with demon spirits. Crowley is the Satanist who the Beatles counted as one of their “Heroes” and is featured as such, on their Srgt Pepper’s Album cover. The Doors also featured Crowley on their album cover as did the Rolling Stones. So, we see Crowley was a major influence among rock n roll musicians.

IN Ozzy Osborne’s most famous song called “Mr. Crowley,” Crowley is eulogized with the following words:

“Mr Crowley, what went down in your head
(Oh) Mr. Crowley, did you talk to the dead
Your lifestyle to me seems so tragic
With the thrill of it all
You fooled all the people with magic
(Yeah)Y
ou waited on Satan's call”

In 1970, The Beatles' number one status was eventually replaced by the band Led Zeppelin. Jimmy Page, the group’s leader, was also a follower of the Satanist, Aleister Crowley. “I have employed his system in my everyday life,” Page said. Part of Crowley’s so-called magic was to train his adherents to write backwards.

And so we have the famous instance of Led Zeppelin’s number one rock song of all time, Stairway to Heaven with interesting forwards and backwards messages.

Forwards, a phrase in the song goes: “your stairway lies on the whispering wind.” But backwards can be heard, “because I live with Satan.”

Forwards is sung:

"If there's a bustle in your hedgerow don't be alarmed now.
It's just a spring clean for the may-queen.

Yes there are two paths you can go by.
But in the long run.
There's still time to change the road you're on."

Backwards can be heard: “Here to my sweet Satan… I want to live it backwards like the Zep whose power is Satan… He will give you give you 666.”

Now I had heard about this backwards masking decades ago but didn’t really believe until I heard it recently with my own ears. These satanic verses can be heard as plain as day.

In Led Zeppelin’s song "Houses of the Holy", they sing outright, "Let the music be YOUR MASTER/ Will you heed the master's call/ Oh, Satan . . ."

Pink Floyd in their song Lucifer Sam sings:

Lucifer Sam, …
Always sitting by your side
Always by your side

By the way all of these tunes are readily available as ring tones on your cell phone in case you were interested.

The song "Sympathy for the Devil" by the Rolling Stones, is the official anthem for the Church of Satan. In it, Lucifer speaks in the first person and asks sympathy for all who meet him.

Lead singer, Mick Jagger claims that Anton Lavey, the founder of the Church of Satan and author of the Satanic Bible, help inspired their music!

How serious are these Rock and Roll bands? At the 1992 MTV Awards, the group Red Hot Chili Peppers, upon receiving their award said:

"FIRST OF ALL we want to thank Satan . . ."

Santana says that when he played with Eric Clapton for [the album] Supernatural, they were literally "calling out the spirits." [9]

The band leader has been quite candid about the fact that he has had supernatural direction and assistance from an occult spirit entity, which calls Metatron. This spirit entity guaranteed and even prophesied the tremendous success of the album Supernatural before the project had even gotten off the ground.[10]

Michael Jackson also believed that it was from the spirit world that he received his songs.

Weird Rock n Roller, Frank Zappas went further when he said: “I'm the devil's advocate. We have our own worshippers who are called 'groupies.' Girls will give their bodies to musicians as you would give a sacrifice to a god."[11]

According to the book, Satanism in America, which is endorsed by the National Criminal Justice Task Force on Occult Related Ritualistic Crimes, hard-core Satanism is, "the fastest-growing subculture among America's TEENS." Studies taken by the Georgia Police Academy revealed — 90% of those involved in Satanism are TEENAGERS!

Madonna is quoted as saying: “I’m a tormented person; I have a lot of demons inside of me.”[12]

The Beatles press officier is quoted as saying: [The Beatles are] completely antichrist. I mean, I am antichrist as well, but they're so antichrist they shock me which isn't an easy thing.[13]

John Lennon said, quote: “I've sold my soul to the devil.[14]

One of the top songs of the 1970's was “Hotel California” by the Eagles.


Most people have no idea the song refers to the Church of Satan, which happens to be located in a converted hotel on California street. On the inside of the album cover, looking down on the festivities, is Anton Lavey, the founder of the Church of Satan. People say, the Eagles aren't serious, they're just selling records. Hardly! The Eagle’s manager, Larry Salter, admitted in the Waco Tribune-Herald, in 1982, that the Eagles were involved with the Church of Satan. Not surprisingly, one of the Eagles's songs is titled “Have A Good Day in Hell”

As I hope is evident we could go on and on and on about the satanic influence of one rock band after other and their music. I have avoided the worst of it by not speaking of human sacrifice and other atrocities that goes on in heavy metal music. But then, can we then take refuge in Christian Rock?

Let’s let a twenty-one-year-old student from Michigan answer this question:

"'Christian rock' has hindered my life because the only difference between 'Christian rock' and secular rock is the words. The beat, rhythm, and the melody are not different; they are the same.

"It does not matter whether I listen to secular or 'Christian rock,' when the songs are over, I feel the same. I feel an emptiness in my soul, a heavy burden. Even 'Christian rock' sometimes makes me feel like going out and getting rowdy or even hurting someone else if they provoke me, and that is against all of God's teachings, and everything God stands for. So get rid of all rock!!!"

The quotes from other young people that think the same about Christian Rock are numerous and readily available.

Let’s take our cue from this 21 year old. What should you do if you now possess Rock n Roll music? The trash can is too good for it. As with other possessed objects, this music should be burnt and destroyed. But in a pinch, a garbage disposal will do.

In the early 1970’s, Christian Rock was brought to a remote town in Indonesia were Christian missionaries were serving there. Christian Rock was supposedly the “in thing” at the time. One night they were playing a record, when an older Christian stopped by the door in astonishment and asked: “Why are you playing witch doctor’s music, by which Satan is called upon?”[15] [16] The music is the same though the words maybe different.

Fr. Basil Nortz spent 3 hours putting together his “Music and Morality” series in which one can easily make the point that Christian Rock is an oxymoron. It is like saying someone can be a Christian hedonist. Rock and Roll appeals to the lower nature of man – it preys upon our emotions. It doesn’t lead us up towards heaven; it delivers us up to our fleshly desires. Rock and Roll is based upon Voodoo rhythms. It doesn’t matter what the words are, the music can never be Christian.

Instead of bringing calm to the passions, which is the aim of Christian virtue, Rock music, whether Christian or not, stimulates the passions and makes what is already difficult to control, even more so.

In the Catholic Church, we have the founder of Life Teen Masses to thank for introducing Rock and Roll regularly into the Sanctuary. The founder of Life Teen is Dale Fushek, who, may God have mercy on his soul, has been indicted for predatory acts with boys, and who thinks it's okay for priests to officiate at Protestant worship services. Needless to say, he is no longer a priest in good standing. And neither is Christian Rock. Church documents on liturgical music throughout the 20th century are explicit in that the music, aside from the words, the music must be sacred. To think that rock and roll, whose very name conjures up mortal sin, to think that this music is sacred, is blasphemous.

"My true belief about Rock 'n' Roll, Little Richard said, “is this: I believe this kind of music is demonic. ... A lot of the beats in music today are taken from voodoo, from the voodoo drums. If you study music in rhythms, like I have, you'll see that is true. I believe that kind of music is driving people from Christ. It is contagious"[17] unquote Little Richard, King of Rock and Roll.

Rock star, David Bowie, who should know what he is talking about said, “Rock has always been the devil’s music, you can’t convince me that it isn’t. - I believe rock and roll is dangerous.”[18]

Plato said that Music and rhythm find their way into the secret places of the soul” May those secret places reserved for God alone never be assailed by such music that clearly leads souls to hell.